cover photo

Sean Tilley

deadsuperhero@parlementum.net

Sean Tilley
 San Francisco, CA 
@Hubzilla Support Forum+

Hey Hubzillans! I'm in the process of setting my hub back up - I'm on Debian 9.0, using PHP 7.0. I have installed required dependencies, but it looks like several PHP modules are not getting picked up by the System Check page. Particularly, these modules are php-curl, php-gd, php-mbstring, php-xml, and php-zip. My guess is that these modules may have a different relative location in this version of Debian, but I cannot be certain.

I'm trying to determine why they're not getting picked up, as I have all of the dependencies in place. Has Hubzilla not yet been tried with PHP7?
Sean Tilley
  
Perfect, thanks!
cer
cer
  last edited: Sun, 23 Jul 2017 00:14:24 -0700  
Can you try unplugging and then plugging the modem back in?


90% of IT is some form of rebooting.
Sean Tilley
  
Too true.

Well, my hub seems to be up and running now. I guess at this point I just need to tweak things - particularly, consolidate my old posts, and ensure that federation is working for Diaspora and OStatus-based networks. ;)
Sean Tilley
 San Francisco, CA 
Looking into getting deadsuperhero.com infrastructure up and running again. First, I need to find a host - does anyone have a recommendation for a provider?
Sean Tilley
  
Great! I've just registered, and now I'm getting everything set up. I'm using Debian 9 this time around; so far I seem to have most of the prerequisites put together. All I need to do is configure apache, and get an SSL certificate configured again.

After that, I should be able to set up my Hubzilla deployment. :D
cer
cer
  
I like that you can pay per diem for services, too.
Seth Martin
  
If you're reviving your old hub and channel, it'll be interesting to find out if you can communicate with existing diaspora connections. I revived my Friendica node after about three months of downtime but it appears that diaspora pods have decided that I don't matter anymore. Connecting with other diaspora members on the same pods works fine though. I may have to ask old contacts to remove and re-add me.
Sean Tilley
 San Francisco, CA 
I've challenged myself to watch the entire series of Star Trek: The Next Generation. Every night after work, I come home and try to watch at least three episodes. Usually, a short ceremony involving the consumption of a burrito is part of this evening ritual.

I started at the beginning of this month, and so far have made it past Season 3, Episode 4.

I should probably mix it up and start watching more than just Star Trek, but so far my experience has been highly positive.
Andrew Manning
  
In my opinion, TNG holds up remarkably well.

I agree. I did something similar maybe five years ago and I was surprised at how much I enjoyed it, and not just from nostalgia. The series is solid all around in terms of acting, screenplay, science fiction, character development, etc, so the super cheesy parts and the fact that the plot is resolved within the last five minutes of each episode are totally acceptable. The techno-babble isn't actually so bad either; a lot of it seems at least based on relevant science most of the time.
Alexandre Hannud Abdo
  
My run of TNG took place at the appartment of a friend who chose to never lock his door so his friends could come in any time - as we did, often at very odd times. It worked so well that for a while I called it our "opium den". For TNG we were usually about 4 people surrounded by popcorn and pizza. Great times...
elmussol
  
Season 3 is where it finds itself and starts to get good. The best is yet to come:-)
Sean Tilley
 San Francisco, CA 
Image/photo

Really stoked to finally get one of these. We used to have a larger one in my childhood home. #IBM #think
Sean Tilley
 San Francisco, CA 
Fake News before 2016: Funny jokes, to be enjoyed by all.

Fake News after 2016: An existential philosophical horror beyond your greatest comprehension.
Sean Tilley
 San Francisco, CA 
* grabs popcorn *

Let's talk about ActivityPub
I wanted to follow up on this Github Issue, in the hopes of furthering useful discussion with the people who presently work on Diaspora.


#diaspora #activitypub
Mike Macgirvin
  
Pass the popcorn.
Jason Robinson
 from Diaspora
Totally agree. Still afraid to read the responses :P
Sean Tilley
  
It's not that bad so far.
Sean Tilley
 San Francisco, CA last edited: Fri, 12 May 2017 00:37:17 -0700  
Oh me, oh my! Nobody knows why. Oh my baby, now don't you cry, I'm gonna get high. #TheDevilMakesThree #NowListening


The Devil Makes Three - "I'm Gonna Get High" [Audio Only]
by New West Records on YouTube
Sean Tilley
  
Sean Tilley updated his profile photo

Image/photo
Sean Tilley
 San Francisco, CA 
Trying to learn approaches to #OStatus in Ruby by staring at how other people have done it.

It's interesting because some implementations just declare everything in a specific object model - for example, rstatus spells out a large schema for authors as well as statuses. There's a lot of information being declared in this way, along with associations between models.

I'll need to study this some more, and experiment.
Mike Macgirvin
  
Salmon is technically not necessary for OStatus - or at least that used to be the case. Now it has taken on a more important role. Salmon was originally invented for blogs. If you imported a blog post from another site and commented on it, there was no way for your comment to get back 'upstream' to the original blog.

This actually matches the way that Diaspora/Friendica/Hubzilla federate comments - by sending them upstream so the original author can re-distribute them, but OStatus doesn't federate comments like this.

Salmon is used in OStatus as kind of an out-of-band notification system. This is how you send 'follow notices' and 'mentions' primarily; as comments in OStatus are traditionally implemented as 'mentions' rather than atom threads (and now "OStatus conversations", which is just plain stupid since we already have two other ways to do this). The GNU-Social folks have taken this one step further and I believe are now refusing salmons which don't mention or target the recipient. If you weren't trying to federate these things you might never know what was going on because none of this is is in the original ostatus specs and there is no requirement in salmon to mention the recipient.
Sean Tilley
  
That's a great explanation, and clears up a lot. I guess the flipside is that I also need to understand how subscriptions / following is accomplished. It's all very good to pass some flag that says "Okay, you're subscribed to them.", but I guess that somehow Account A has to poll Account B's feed for new updates somehow. It's a little unclear whether you'd just use Salmon for following feeds, or whether that's purely reserved for interactions on content within a feed.

I think my first step is to make my authors model accessible to webfinger. At the very least, I should be able to pass the avatar, name, and bio as values. I guess the handle and follow status would also be useful strings to pass along.

I apologize for all the questions - thank you so much for taking the time to explain these things. :)
Mike Macgirvin
  
Mastodon and to some extent GNU-Social now ignore webfinger completely for important author information. This is actually quite bizarre, as it is the entire purpose of webfinger to provide this info so you can discover it. GNU-Social discovers your salmon endpoint in webfinger and reports in the logs that it has found it - and then immediately discards it. Then they pull the same info from the Atom feed. If it isn't in the Atom feed they can't communicate with you because they discarded the salmon link they found in webfinger. This is a somewhat recent change.

Anyway what you do is look at webfinger and also the feed to grab the info you need to communicate. Then use pubsubhubbub to subscribe to the feed. At this point you're a follower but the other person doesn't know it. So you send a follow activity (actor: you, verb: activitystreams follow, object: that person) via salmon. If all goes well they'll get the notification that you're following them and they'll in turn pull in your communication information (using webfinger/atom) and stash it in the DB. Subscribing to their feed with PuSH means when they add new content to their feed, it will get pushed to you. You don't need to poll their feed for changes. You just need to have a callback URL which accepts the feed and processes it when it gets pushed to you.
Sean Tilley
 San Francisco, CA 
Basic Federation (Atom Feeds for Authors) · Issue #4 · DeadSuperHero/pine

Meanwhile, this young fool tries to spec out what needs to happen with federation in #Pine. I think I have the basic abstract idea down, I just need to figure out how to use it with the latest version of #Rails.

I'm not yet sure what conventions to use in Rails to do this, and in my head the schema is probably very basic.  I'm not 100% sure though; looking at the schema for a Mastodon Status revealed some surprises about what all a status object accounts for.

A peak at Mastodon's Stream Entry model might give some insight into what I need.

Sean Tilley
 San Francisco, CA 
Super rough, no federation / subscription capabilities yet, but #Pine is making progress.

Image/photo

It's mostly a hobby-experiment, as well as a challenge to see if I can figure out how to make something federate with software.

These are early days. You can follow along here: https://github.com/DeadSuperHero/pine
Thomas Willingham
 from Friendica
I'd not heard of webmention before, and I think you're right - it does quality.

I also think I might implement it.
Thomas Willingham
 from Friendica
s/quality/qualify
JRandal
  
I've got webmention on my blog. Not sure I know so well how to use it, though. :)

Sean Tilley
  last edited: Sun, 23 Apr 2017 23:31:11 -0700  
I decided to check in on the #Hubzilla BountySource page, and remembered that I've been formally donating to the project for over 7 months now.

I can only give so much, but I am happy to set a small donation aside every month. Hubzilla is a project that I've come to really appreciate, and its future success is important to me.

The system looks so much better than when I last saw it. It looks like navigation has been finally really nailed down, and the updated Focus styling for redbasic feels much cleaner.
Sean Tilley
  
Agreed. It also feels that much smoother on mobile!
hEARt | tobias
  
So true. I temporarily had to cancel my donations but they will resume pretty soon. Things are getting back to being planable.
Beni Grind
  
Thanks for the reminder. I had to cancel the support due to a blocked credit card. Now I've got a new one and could resume my support.

Sean Tilley
  
Hey #Hubzilla community! Good to be back. grinning face

I've been using #Mastodon for a little while now, and for microblogging, I quite like it. It's interesting to witness the emergence of a Rails-based federated microblogging app, especially one with its own OStatus implementation, and the fact that it can federate with GNU Social.

Image/photo

There are a few really remarkable things here:

  • Coverage - Most notably, Mastodon seems to be operating under a similar hype bubble to what #Diaspora went through. I think Eugen has a lot more going for his project than D* had when it was getting coverage, but there are a lot of similarities between the two projects. Of course, media is doing a spectacular job at butchering all of the relevant facts, and focusing narrowly on one project within a space of many others.


  • Engagement - It's actually really fun to use, and people engage with each other a lot. The recent spike going on feels a lot like early Twitter, with an extra helping of discovering a great BBS community. In the two weeks that I've been there, I've garnered about 400 connections, and post several hundred times a day.


  • Architecture - Mastodon runs on Ruby on Rails, and has a modular enough design that all of the OStatus parts are contained in a Ruby gem that was built from scratch. What's interesting here is that it also comes with a defined API, and several rather polished mobile clients exist for Android and iOS. The whole experience is extremely smooth, and enables on-to-go microblogging with the benefits of federation.


  • Community Relations - There's a schism between different platforms that can inter-communicate. This makes me remember the flamewars between Diaspora and Friendica. In this more contemporary set of circumstances, there seems to be some enmity between developers of GNU Social-derived networks and Mastodon. Apparently, Eugen is a SABDFL type figure, and does not appear overtly concerned about how his project affects others. In some ways, this appears to be hurting his early user/developer community.


  • Core User Community - One interesting aspect is that Mastodon's early development catered to a quite varied audience, generally considered to be left-leaning. It consisted of furries, trans and queer folk, communists, anti-capitalists, and feminists.

    At a user community level, there appears to be a dynamic clash between GNU Social users, and everyone else. Although they and other OStatus-powered platforms also include all of the above sorts of identities, they also contain many others who clash with it. As a result, Mastodon is learning the hard way that the federated web actually includes pretty much anybody and everybody, and that you can't regulate how other people use their servers, let alone the software.

    As such, this part of the federation is going through a dialectic about "federated safe spaces" vs "federated free speech zones". The funny thing is that neither idea is necessarily incompatible with the other, though both camps believe themselves to be diametrically opposed.
cer
cer
  
thinking face
Beni Grind
  
I've been part of the GNU Social community since the Laconica days and I always liked it for what it was. It covered the space somewhere between microblogging and async irc - always without any privacy features.

Hubzilla is something completely different and I never felt the need to choose one over the other.
Sean Tilley
  
Agreed, I kind of view each as a full replacement to their proprietary analogues.

Of course, one unusual inevitability of protocol convergence is that it may create a UX clash, where some people can only write short posts, but can easily read long posts. Many GS instances don't have a character limit, so that's not really an issue. However, Mastodon does, and I wonder whether that might break the experience for them.
Sean Tilley
  
Wow, #Hubzilla is looking great!  :D
Sean Tilley
  
Great to have you back, Sean!


Great to be back! I know I've been off of long-form federated networks for a little while, having to give up hosting for finances in the short term has been a difficult trade-off.

I'm slowly working back up to self-hosting, but the first part of it is committing more time and focus to online communities.
Andrew Manning
  
Self-hosting is great and all, but it is by no means imperative if you can find someone you trust enough for your purposes. I'm glad you have priorities.
cer
cer
  
/me *evil cackle* mwahahahahhahaahaha
cer
cer
  
I love this image. Even more I love thinking about its meaning. It captures an enormous explosion millions of years ago. Does it still exist since we can see it?
Mike Macgirvin
  
If it's in fact explosive remnants, they will have continued to disperse outward from the blast origin. What remains depends on the force of the explosion and how long ago it happened. But I really don't see that here. My young professional career was spent examining properties of plasma. That's exactly what I see here. In that case it would probably still be here, but amorphous and slowly changing.
Jake Moomaw
  
These are the Pillars of Creation, part of the Eagle Nebula.  The Eagle Nebula is a remnant of a supernova that exploded about 1.2 million years ago, and this small portion of it happens to be incredibly active in star creation.  It also no longer exists, unfortunately.  The Spitzer telescope detected the shock wave from a nearby supernova approaching it that will be powerful enough to disperse most of the gas that has not already started accreting into new stars.  The shock wave will hit the Pillars about 1000 years after this photo was taken, but since they are 7000 light years away, they were wiped out about 6000 years ago.

This photo is one of my favorite Hubble images, and it's hard to believe that it was taken in 1995. It's even harder to believe that Hubble has been up there for 27 years.  It will be sad to see it go in a couple of years, but I'm really excited for the James Webb Space Telescope which is slated to launch in October.  Hubble primarily sees visible light with a 2.4 meter mirror, and has done an unbelievably good job of showing us what the universe looks like.  Because it sees visible light, it has only been able to show us our grown ass universe with any detail, since the light from our awkward teenage years has red shifted so much.  JWST is going to see primarily infrared with a 6.5 meter mirror, and should be able to peer back even further into our past and show us how we got to where we are now.