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The Wind in the Willows in the OED | OxfordWords blog

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The river is home to Rat (Ratty to his friends) – who is in fact a Water Vole (from the Norwegian vollmus ‘field mouse’) – and whose first appearance in the story is recorded in the OED entry for water rat: ‘A brown little face, with whiskers… Small neat ears and thick silky hair. It was the Water Rat!’. There may be a more direct connection between Ratty and the OED, since it has been proposed that Grahame’s model for this character was Dr Frederick Furnivall, one of the key instigators of the dictionary project in the 1860s, who was himself a keen rower. In 1896, at the age of 71, Furnivall – an advocate of gender equality – founded the Hammersmith Sculling Club for Girls, which survives today as the Furnivall Sculling Club.
Manuel Jiménez Friaza
  
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La Fenice Channel - Musica e Cultura

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La Fenice Channel - Musica e Cultura

#opera
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What Have I Learned by Gary Snyder | Monday, April 24, 2017 | The Writer's Almanac with Garrison Keillor
What Have I Learned by Gary Snyder | Monday, April 24, 2017 | The Writer's Almanac with Garrison Keillor

What have I learned but
the proper use for several tools?

The moments
between hard pleasant tasks

To sit silent, drink wine,
and think my own kind
of dry crusty thoughts.

       —the first Calochortus flowers
       and in all the land,
       it’s spring.
       I point them out:
       the yellow petals, the golden hairs,
       to Gen.

Seeing in silence:
never the same twice,
but when you get it right,

              you pass it on.
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Word of the day: PROCAFFEINATE – to put off doing anything until you’ve had your first cup of coffee.
-- QI Elves
Manuel Jiménez Friaza
  
:like
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People Like Us by Robert Bly | Wednesday, April 19, 2017 | The Writer's Almanac with Garrison Keillor
People Like Us by Robert Bly | Wednesday, April 19, 2017 | The Writer's Almanac with Garrison Keillor

for James Wright

There are more like us. All over the world
There are confused people, who can’t remember
The name of their dog when they wake up, and people
Who love God but can’t remember where

He was when they went to sleep. It’s
All right. The world cleanses itself this way.
A wrong number occurs to you in the middle
Of the night, you dial it, it rings just in time

To save the house. And the second-story man
Gets the wrong address, where the insomniac lives,
And he’s lonely, and they talk, and the thief
Goes back to college. Even in graduate school,

You can wander into the wrong classroom,
And hear great poems lovingly spoken
By the wrong professor. And you find your soul,
And greatness has a defender, and even in death you’re safe.
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Parlementum
  
Parlementum tagged Parlementum's post with ⋕poem
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A Prayer in Spring by Robert Frost | Saturday, April 22, 2017 | The Writer's Almanac with Garrison Keillor
A Prayer in Spring by Robert Frost | Saturday, April 22, 2017 | The Writer's Almanac with Garrison Keillor

Oh, give us pleasure in the flowers today;
And give us not to think so far away
As the uncertain harvest; keep us here
All simply in the springing of the year.

Oh, give us pleasure in the orchard white,
Like nothing else by day, like ghosts by night;
And make us happy in the happy bees,
The swarm dilating round the perfect trees.

And make us happy in the darting bird
That suddenly above the bees is heard,
The meteor that thrusts in with needle bill,
And off a blossom in mid air stands still.
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Parlementum
  
Parlementum tagged Parlementum's post with ⋕poem
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[W]hile every ploughman in its outlying fields renders to once puissant Lord Treasurers, Archbishops, Bishops, and such-like, the attention which the Ogre in the story-book desired to render his unbidden visitor, and grinds their bones to make his bread.
-- The Mystery of Edward Drood by Charles Dickens

Such an atmospheric description to set the scene; age and decay, and that we all are reduced to bones for the plough.

#amreading

The D. Case: The Truth About the Mystery of Edwin Drood by Charles Dickens

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Click to read more about The D. Case: The Truth About the Mystery of Edwin Drood by Charles Dickens.  LibraryThing is a cataloging and social networking site for booklovers
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Some Irish words with Norse Origins  | Irish Archaeology

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The year 795 AD saw a new force arrive on the Irish political scene, the Vikings. These seaborne warriors were to have a significant impact on Irish life.
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#Iceberg near St. John's Narrows, Fort Amherst #Newfoundland, #Canada
(by Shawn Hudson via @IcebergQuest)

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The spread of education add to the writer's burdens by multiplying that pestilent fellow the critical reader...
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The Maps of Piri Reis

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Piri Reis was a 16th century Ottoman Admiral famous for his maps and charts collected in his Kitab-ı Bahriye (Book of Navigation), a book which contains detailed information on navigation as well as extremely accurate charts describing the important ports and cities of the Mediterranean Sea.
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Goblin Market by Christina Rossetti

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Morning and evening
Maids heard the goblins cry:
“Come buy our orchard fruits,
Come buy, come buy:
Apples and quinces,
Lemons and oranges,
Plump unpeck’d cherries,
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"What the Garden of Eden would have looked like if God had had the money."
-- George S Kaufman on Moss Hart's landscaping.

Sheridan Whiteside: [opening a box of candy] Ah, pecan butternut fudge!
Nurse Preen: Oh, my, you mustn't eat candy, Mr. Whiteside, it's very bad for you.
Sheridan Whiteside: My great aunt Jennifer ate a whole box of candy every day of her life. She lived to be 102 and when she'd been dead three days she looked better than you do *now!*
-- The Man Who Came to Dinner by Kaufman & Hart
Jake Moomaw
  
My Great Aunt Maude lived to be 104.  She lived by herself until she was 102, and as a Christian Scientist she didn't see a doctor until she was 101.  She always had a big bowl of stale Cheetos on her table, and they were her one guilty pleasure.  The last time that she saw her younger brother, John, she was 89 and John was 78.  John, being a very vocal Seventh Day Adventist, saw the bowl and exclaimed, very loudly, "If you keep eating those Cheetos, it will lead you to an early demise!"

It's been thirty years, and we still laugh about that.
Mike Macgirvin
  
Wouldn't it be funny if Cheetos turned out to be the ultimate "fountain-of-youth" longevity super food? Or Twinkies...
Parlementum
  
There was a Woody Allen comedy that posited that. Sleeper?
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The Prince had always liked his London, when it had come to him; he was one of the modern Romans who find by the Thames a more convincing image of the truth of the ancient state than any they have left by the Tiber. Brought up on the legend of the City to which the world paid tribute, he recognised in the present London much more than in contemporary Rome the real dimensions of such a case. If it was a question of an Imperium, he said to himself, and if one wished, as a Roman, to recover a little the sense of that, the place to do so was on London Bridge, or even, on a fine afternoon in May, at Hyde Park Corner.
  -- Henry James, The Golden Bowl

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"It breaks your heart. It is designed to break your heart. The game begins in the spring when everything else begins again, and it blossoms in the summer, filling the afternoons and evenings, and then as soon as the chill rains come, it stops and leaves you to face the fall alone."
-- A Bartlett Giamatti, Renaissance Scholar, President of Yale, Commissioner of Baseball

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Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog)

I remember going to the British Museum one day to read up the treatment for some slight ailment of which I had a touch—hay fever, I fancy it was.  I got down the book, and read all I came to read; and then, in an unthinking moment, I idly turned the leaves, and began to indolently study diseases, generally.  I forget which was the first distemper I plunged into—some fearful, devastating scourge, I know—and, before I had glanced half down the list of “premonitory symptoms,” it was borne in upon me that I had fairly got it.

I sat for awhile, frozen with horror; and then, in the listlessness of despair, I again turned over the pages.  I came to typhoid fever—read the symptoms—discovered that I had typhoid fever, must have had it for months without knowing it—wondered what else I had got; turned up St. Vitus’s Dance—found, as I expected, that I had that too,—began to get interested in my case, and determined to sift it to the bottom, and so started alphabetically—read up ague, and learnt that I was sickening for it, and that the acute stage would commence in about another fortnight.  Bright’s disease, I was relieved to find, I had only in a modified form, and, so far as that was concerned, I might live for years.  Cholera I had, with severe complications; and diphtheria I seemed to have been born with.  I plodded conscientiously through the twenty-six letters, and the only malady I could conclude I had not got was housemaid’s knee.

I felt rather hurt about this at first; it seemed somehow to be a sort of slight.  Why hadn’t I got housemaid’s knee?  Why this invidious reservation?  After a while, however, less grasping feelings prevailed.  I reflected that I had every other known malady in the pharmacology, and I grew less selfish, and determined to do without housemaid’s knee.  Gout, in its most malignant stage, it would appear, had seized me without my being aware of it; and zymosis I had evidently been suffering with from boyhood.  There were no more diseases after zymosis, so I concluded there was nothing else the matter with me.


Read it: https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/308
Listen to it: https://librivox.org/three-men-in-a-boat-by-jerome-k-jerome/ (Two other versions available)
Watch it:


Three Men in a Boat [Jerome K Jerome] Full Movie- With Subtitles.
by Gampa Abhinay on YouTube
(1975 BBC comedy film adapted by Tom Stoppard, directed by Stephen Frears and starring Tim Curry, Michael Palin, and Stephen Moore.)

Subject     Young men -- Travel -- England -- Thames River -- Fiction
Subject     Boats and boating -- England -- Thames River -- Fiction
Subject     Dogs -- Fiction
Subject     Humorous stories, English
Subject     Thames River (England) -- Fiction
Subject     Male friendship -- Fiction
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The Sea Monk (ca. 1845)

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A woodblock print, by the late Edo period artist Utagawa Kuniyoshi, illustrating the story of an encounter with the Sea Monk or Umibozu, a spirit in Japanese folklore.

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Scholars and their Silly Questions
by sententiaeantiquae on SENTENTIAE ANTIQUAE

The following poems are taken from the Greek Anthology.  Both provide interesting possible origins for the phrase “bookworm”. A google search for the origin of the term is rather disappointing and points to book-eating species. But what if the species were named for scholars?
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Annual Balance Sheet from the city of Ur, is currently in the Louvre Museum.

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