Rex Mundi
 Digital Underground with Tinfoil Hats 
#storynotes Did some lightweight research on the home fronts during the real WW2. Of course, I was aware of rationing, victory gardens, shortages, hemlines going up due to lack of fabric, recycling, Rosie the Riveter etc etc. One thing I was not really aware of was the drop in caloric intake in most places during the war.  Bicycling and walking were common due to gasoline shortages. I am not sure that people were healthier due to the food shortages. The UK had initially banned cinema feeling that it was 'frivilous' but found that it was necessary for morale. Many people went to the cinema several times a week. TV came to the UK in 1936. (I did not know this) but it was not widespread so it was banned during the war years. I'll do another post on propaganda, which was as prevalent in the Allied countries as the Axis.
Rex Mundi
  
According to something I read last night the Nazis used food as a weapon. After the blitz of Poland the Germans living in Poland averaged 2,600 calories a day. The Poles averaged a quarter of that. The Jews in the Warsaw ghetto averaged a quarter of the calories the Poles obtained. The Jews only got 184 calories a day.

Similarly in occupied France most of the French food production went to feed Germans, whether the Germans were in France or elsewhere. The Nazi food war in France was so bad that 1 in 10 French housewives turned to prostitution just to feed their kids.

I'll have to double check the source later today but I think the article said that Europe had three major famines during the war years and only the one in the area of Belgium was attributed to human (Nazi) causes.

I am not sure how much oil the US imported during the war years, I imagine it wasn't much truthfully, but tankers were routinely targeted by the Japanese Navy.

As all the raw material for rubber came from areas under Japanese control I think a rubber shortage may have been a real threat.
Rex Mundi
  
Even if it was all a big lie the lie worked.

My grandmother, born in 1917 or 18 no one knows for sure but she was an adult when the depression came, was wont to say that "we didn't know there was a depression going on until someone told us." Her life didn't change much whether the stock market was up or down or what business went bankrupt. She would say the above quote whenever the topic of economic depression came up and then not two minutes later would say that the Depression was the worst period in US history and that everyone's lives were ruined because of it.

So true or not the propaganda worked and that is really where my brain is. Even in the "The Man in the High Castle," produced in the modern politically correct era, one can see the stereotypes. One of the Japanese characters has the appearance of being near-sighted with big round glasses and every Nazi is portrayed as evil brutal schemers.
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Agreed, my grandparents had a basement stocked with canned goods to last for months, until their dying day.